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MacEwan, John Walter Grant - 1991
MacFarlane, John Duncan -1979
MacKay, Angus - 1973
MacKay, Murdoch - 1994
Maharg, John Archibald - 1977
Mainil, Arthur Armond (Art) - 2017
Martynse, Henry - 2005
McArthur, Neil - 1985
McConnell, Lillian Vigrass - 2001
McGillivray, Murray Ross - 2015
McKenzie, Roy - 1994
McKercher, Robert (Bob) - 2017
McMillan, Ivan - 1996
McNamee, Louis P. - 1972
McNaughton, Violet - 1972
McPhail, Hugh Duncan - 1999
McPhail, Alexander James - 1972
McRorie, Howard Douglas - 1995
Melville-Ness, Thomas Robertson - 1979
Mendel, Fred S. - 1990
Miller, William - 1975
Mitchell, Charles Stuart - 1986
Mitchell, John - 1973
Montgomery, Dale Kenneth - 2014
Morken, W.G. "Bud" - 1997
Morrall, Robin - 2016

Morris, George Henry - 1977
Moss, Harold Charles - 1991
Mossing, Oscar Johan - 2006
Motherwell, William Richard - 1972

PortraitAngus MacKay

Angus MacKay was born of Scottish parents on a farm near Pickering, Ontario, and was educated at a grammar school at Whitby. After farming in his home district in Ontario, he left for Western Canada in 1881 with three other Pickering farmers, with the intention of forming a co-operative type of farm enterprise. After some delays, due to difficult travelling conditions, the co-operative farm was actually established at Indian Head, Saskatchewan in 1882.

In the following five years, Angus MacKay demonstrated his ability as a farmer, and when the co-operative enterprise was dissolved in 1887, he was appointed as superintendent of the first Dominion Experimental Farm in Western Canada at Indian Head. In this role, with advanced ideas about the conservation of soil and moisture, he introduced farming techniques which were to become standard practice in successful Prairie farming. Best remembered is his advocacy of summerfallowing grain fields every second or third year, with an eye to conserving moisture, using the land itself as a storage bank.

Much of the fieldwork in the cereal breeding program started by the late Dr. William Saunders was done at Indian Head under Angus MacKay's supervision. From that program came Marquis wheat, destined to set a new standard of quality for Western Canada.

A practical farmer with an eye for beauty, Angus MacKay did much to encourage the planting of shelter belts on Prairie farms, with the Forestry Farm at Indian Head supplying the stock, a policy which is still in force.

Although he retired from his post at Indian Head in 1914, he continued with an active career in various phases of agriculture until his death in 1931. He was a member of the advisory council of the College of Agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan, and a life member of the Saskatchewan Horticultural Societies Association. In 1922, in recognition of his work on behalf of agriculture, he was given an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws by the University.

"Nominated for the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame
by the Canada Department of Agriculture, 1973."

 

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