A
B C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Karamanos, Rigas Evangelos - 2015
Keller, Wilfred Arthur (Wilf) - 2017
Kennedy, Alex - 2014
Kennedy, Peter Hugh - 1978
Kilcher, Mark - 2003
Kilden, Marie - 1985
Kimber, Clement James - 1978
Kirk, Lawrence Eldrid - 1973
Kirkland, Kenneth John - 2002
Knott, Douglas Ronald - 1995
Knowles, Robert Patrick - 2006
Knowles, Robert Gordon - 1990
Koch, Alanna Lee - 2011
Kristjanson, Leo Friman - 1990

PortraitPeter Hugh Kennedy

Peter Hugh Kennedy, the father of field shelterbelts on the Prairies, was born in Glengarry County, Ontario. He headed west in 1904, homesteading on the bare open Prairie near what is now Conquest, Saskatchewan.

In 1922 he planted trees on three sides of his home section of land and became convinced of their value as a windbreak and moisture conserver. Blowing dust in the 1930s prompted him to petition for a federal government program of support for tree planting. Minister of Agriculture Robert Weir agreed to Mr. Kennedyís proposal that tree planting be included as part of the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation program.

Mr. Kennedy then helped organize the Conquest Field Shelterbelt Association, and for many years was its secretary. Over the next 25 years more than 800 miles of field shelterbelts were planted in the Conquest area. Value of these trees became apparent as they trapped snow and retained moisture as well as breaking the force of the wind.

The Saskatchewan Department of Agriculture, profiting from the Conquest example, began about 1950 to promote a province-wide program of shelterbelt planting. More than 8,000 miles of field and roadside shelterbelts resulted.

From 1948 to 1960 Mr. Kennedy operated his farm as an experimental substation under contract to the Canada Department of Agriculture. Extensive research was undertaken into moisture conservation. He was an early advocate of continuous cropping and elimination of summerfallow and these practises were tested on the Kennedy farm.

Peter Kennedyís monument is the hundreds of miles of caragana and other trees planted 40 rods apart in the Conquest district and throughout wide stretches of the western plains.

"Nominated for the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame
by Agriculture Canada, 1978"

 

The information contained in this website is the property of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall of Fame.
When using information from the website please acknowledge the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall of Fame as the information source.

© 2016 Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame