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Halford, James William - 2010
Hanson, Ellert Olaus &
Helmer Hartman -
1993
Hardy, Evan Alan - 1973
Harlton, George Ivan - 1993
Harrington, James Bishop - 1976
Harrison, Joseph Sinclair - 2009
Hart, Elsie Mable - 1979
Harvey, Bryan Laurence - 2006
Hass, Glenden William - 2005
Haupstein, Elvin Stefan - 2014
Heinrichs, David H. - 2000
Henry, James Leslie - 2004
Hewlett, Annie Elizabeth May - 1975
Heyer, Adolph - 1986
Hill, Alice Reber - 1988
Hobman, Clayton Glencairn - 2008
Horkoff, Audrey Janice - 2009
Horner, William Harold - 1992
Howard, Thelma M. - 2012
Hull, Joseph Ernest - 1999
Hummel, Guy Hartsel - 1972

PortraitJames William Halford

Jim Halford pioneered the development of zero-till farming in Saskatchewan and the entire Prairie region. As much as anyone else, he is responsible for the transformation of farming practices that occurred.

Born at Indian Head in 1941, Jim Halford was a distinguished graduate of the College of Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan in 1963. This was followed by a Master’s degree in Agricultural Economics in 1966 and a Nuffield Agriculture Scholarship in 1976. While working as a Farm Management Specialist with the Saskatchewan Department of Agriculture, he started farming in the mid-60s on the Halford family farm.

He soon realized that wind and water erosion were ravaging his fragile soils. Jim gradually concluded that zero-till, a new farming practice being attempted in the U.S., had the most promise for restoring soil health. In the late 70s, he began to apply the zero-till system on his farm.

It soon became clear that seeding equipment with air delivery of seed and fertilizer was needed – equipment that could operate in heavy crop residue while placing the seed and all the nutrient requirements in a one-pass system. In 1983, he built a prototype Conserva Pak TM to use on his own farm and applied for patents on the design.

By 1989, Jim had launched a business manufacturing and marketing Conserva Pak seeding systems in Canada, and by 1993, in the U.S. and Australia. The principles were adopted by many other makers of direct seeding equipment. One-pass direct seeding with limited soil disturbance became the norm in Western Canada. In 2007, Conserva Pak Seeding Systems technology was sold to farm equipment giant John Deere.

Jim Halford coordinated development of the Saskatchewan Soil Conservation Association and was a founding director of the Indian Head Agricultural Research Foundation (IHARF).

The one-pass seeding system that Jim pioneered became recognized as a best management practice for minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. As soil organic matter increases, more carbon is stored in the soil.

Jim Halford was the inspiration and catalyst behind many of the countless individuals who worked on soil conservation and zero tillage in Saskatchewan.

Sponsored for the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame 2010 by the Indian Head Agricultural Research Foundation and the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrologists.

 

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