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Gallaway, Ronald John - 1994
Gardiner, James Garfield - 1972
Gaudet, Ronald - 2003
Gibbings, Charles William - 1988
Gjesdal, J. Harvey - 1992
Gleave, Alfred Pullen - 2000
Gramiak, Larry Ronald - 2004
Grant, Douglas H. - 1995
Greenshields, John Edward Ross - 1988
Greyeyes, Harold - 1992

PortraitHarold Greyeyes

Harold Greyeyes was born on the Muskeg Lake Reserve near Leask. He serves as a role model, both as farmer and as extension worker, encouraging better farming practices on reserves.

When Harold was a youth he worked on the family farm, on land his grandfather had broken before the turn of the century. He took his high school education at Lebret and, later, worked in the lumber industry in British Columbia for five years. Harold returned to Muskeg Lake in 1960 to farm and raise quality cattle. He served on the band council in 1962.

In 1969 he began his career as a teacher and promoter of better agricultural practices on Indian reserves. He was the first full-blooded Indian in this work, mainly in Meadow Lake, North Battleford and Prince Albert districts. He began his extension work with reserves through involvement in the federal Agricultural Rehabilitation and Development Administration (ARDA). Working in co-operation with the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN), the ARDA program helped establish the Saskatchewan Indian Agricultural Program (SIAP) in 1974.

Programs for native farmers on reserves required an approach geared to the unique reserve circumstances. Haroldís work in developing and delivering agricultural workshops, livestock courses and other programs was influential in developing reserve land in the northwest and helping establish the value of the program for native farmers throughout Saskatchewan.

He became a popular worker in this field. He took specialized courses at the University of Saskatchewan, from Saskatchewan Agriculture and at a winter extension school in Arizona, learning new extension methods applicable in his situation.

Harold has been active in 4-H programs, bringing this form of agricultural extension to Indian youth.

He is involved in the North Battleford community where he has lived since 1975. He is the first full-blooded Indian to serve as President of a Rotary Club, the North Battleford club, where he has been a member since 1975. In 1985 he became a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow, an honor bestowed on him by his club, and in 1989 served as District Governor representative in Rotary District 536. He has also been active in the Indian and Metis Friendship Centre in North Battleford. He continues as agricultural extension assistant for the Saskatchewan Indian Agriculture Program in the northwest.

"Sponsored for the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame, 1992
by the Saskatchewan Indian Agricultural Program and
the North Battleford Rotary Club"

 

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