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Farley, William Manly - 1998
Farquharson, James - 1977
Fast, Harold - 2015
Faye, Zennith Keith - 2013
Flaten, Glenn Eric - 1998
Fowler, Henry Llewellyn - 1980
Fox, Jonathan - 1981
Freitag, Rudolph - 1995
Friggstad, Olaf - 1997

PortraitRudolph Freitag

Rudolph Freitag, farmer and Belgian horse breeder, was born April 29, 1900, in Slabodka, the Ukraine. He grew up on his fatherís farm and received his early education in the Slabodka district.

Under the sponsorship of his uncle, Leo Kolke of Frobisher, Rudy moved to Canada in 1929 with his wife, Mary and three children. For the next five years Rudy and his family lived with an uncle at Outram. By 1935 he had accumulated sufficient livestock and machinery to operate a farm he had rented near Alameda. Gradually he acquired land until he owned two sections northwest of Alameda. He and Mary also added seven more children to the fold for a total of nine boys and one girl.

In 1937 he purchased a purebred Belgian stallion called Warrior. This fine animal was put to work on the stud circuit in the Alameda and Frobisher districts. A second stallion was acquired and, in 1944, Rudy went into the horse breeding business in a serious way with the purchase of a purebred Belgian mare.

In 1947 he started exhibiting his horses at fairs and his entries placed so well he was encouraged to make the complete fair circuit 10 times. He showed at Saskatoon 17 times, Regina 19 times and the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto 20 consecutive years. His Toronto Royal winnings included three championships, seven reserves and a gold medal won in 1948 for his horses, Cookie and Betty Lou, which were adjudged best Canadian owned and bred progeny of dam. His six-horse hitch won six times on the western class A circuit. He retired from the show ring in 1974 and died a year later. His sons maintained the purebred Belgian string.

Rudy served for 12 years as a director of the Canadian Belgian Horse Association, which included one term as president. He was a long-time director of the Saskatchewan Horse Breeders Association, with one term as president. Locally he served for many years as a director of the Alameda fair. In 1987 he was honored by the Saskatchewan Livestock Board with a scroll in appreciation of the valuable services he rendered to his community, his province and the livestock industry.

"Nominated for the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame 1995
by the Alameda Agricultural Society, R.M. Moose Creek No. 33
and the South East Draft Horse Association."

 

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