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Delage, Maurice Allan - 2012
Delahey, Marjorie Elizabeth - 2002
Delury, Abigail - 2005
Dixon, Sophia Hansine - 1994
Dosman, James A. - 2011
Douglas, James Moffat - 1976
Downey, Richard Keith - 1996
Ducie, Emma - 1977
Ducie, Alma Helene - 1991
Dunning, Charles Avery - 1973
Dyck, Alfred H. - 1991

Portrait

Abigail Delury

First Director of Women's Work at the University of Saskatchewan , Abigail DeLury is credited with vastly expanding the base and effectiveness of rural women's organization in Saskatchewan . Born in Manilla, Ontario , in 1868, she trained as a teacher at Port Perry and Toronto Normal School and then taught for 14 years.

She obtained her diploma in Home Economics from the Ontario Agricultural College and taught at Macdonald College , McGill University , before moving to Moose Jaw in 1910 to teach home economics in the public schools. The University of Saskatchewan 's first Extension Director, F. Hedley Auld, heard of her background and hired her for the summers of 1911 and 1912 to visit local fairs and to encourage women to form Homemakers' clubs. These clubs were seen as useful tools for supporting family life, community building, promoting the interests of rural young people, emphasizing the cultural side of life and educating in citizenship.

Such was her success at this task that, in 1913, Abigail was appointed Director of Women's Work at the University, reporting directly to President Walter Murray. She was the first woman with a permanent appointment at the university. She was to provide direction to the Homemakers' Clubs and advance home economics extension services to women and families in the province.

In 1914, the year after her appointment, there were 90 Homemakers' clubs in Saskatchewan . When she resigned in 1930 there were 240 with 5,800 members.

She traveled the province advocating activities that enhanced farm home and community life at a time when immigrants were swarming in to take up homesteads. She encouraged Homemakers to promote tree planting, boys' and girls' club work (now called 4-H), poultry raising, beekeeping, fruit growing, better education, better health services and a better, more co-operative community spirit.

She retired in 1930 and died in 1957 but left behind a strong structure at the University and among women's organizations in Saskatchewan , enabling continuation and expansion of the good work she had begun.

 

Sponsored for the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame 2005
by the Association of Saskatchewan Home Economists,
Saskatchewan Women's Institutes and the
Extension Division, University of Saskatchewan

 

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